Linda Dorigo (b. 1983, Italy) is a photojournalist and filmmaker. She pursued journalistic studies, obtaining a Bachelor’s degree in Communication Sciences in Italy, where she became interested in social and anthropological reporting with a slow photojournalism approach. Her work looks at faith, religions, minorities and land, understood as the birthplace of the roots of belonging.

 

After graduating from University in 2006, she moved to Lisbon working as an assistant in a commercial photography studio, but she soon decided that documentary photography was to be her main focus. While in Portugal, Linda developed a photographic project about the so-called “Zona J”, a suburban neighborhood in the eastern side of Lisbon where mostly people from the former Portuguese colonies in Africa live. A year later, she won an IRSE-Regional Institute for European Studies award and left the studio to engage with photojournalism in the Middle East.

 

From 2007 to 2010 she lived in Italy, collaborating with international newspapers and magazines and together traveling to Iran to shoot a short film about the impact of the 2009 Green Revolution on Iranian youth. “Safar-e sabz” is the result of this audio-visual research, whose approach dates back to the “Ipotesi Cinema” laboratory of Ermanno Olmi.

 

Based in Beirut between 2010 and 2014, Linda traveled to Lebanon, Iraq, Iran, Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Israel, the West Bank and Gaza to work on a long-term project about Christian communities of the Middle East. With journalist Andrea Milluzzi, she documented the daily life of the small Christian communities that choose to not be part of the diaspora. The book “Rifugio. Christians of the Middle East”, published by Schilt Publishing in 2015, is a poetic exploration of a religious minority, disillusioned witnesses closed in their self-defense. Two traveling exhibitions, entitled “Nostalghia”, are running in Europe and in the Middle East.

 

Linda returned to Italy in mid-2014 and she is now based in Rome. Among her clients: Al Jazeera, L’espresso, Le Monde, Huffington Post, Marie Claire. She is currently working on a long term participative project about Kurdish identity in collaboration with Kurds in Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, aiming to reframe the Kurds’ strongest symbol – the mountains – in a way that is removed from centuries-old clichés and colonial legacies.